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Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup

Ready to be the envy of your lunch table? This low FODMAP Thai noodle soup is the lunch you’ve been waiting for. Packed with fresh flavours, this soup will keep your taste buds and your tummy happy!

Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup in Bowl - 810 x 450

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Since mastering my low FODMAP Thai red curry paste, I’ve been sneaking it into as many recipes as possible. This low FODMAP Thai noodle soup may be one of my favourite creations so far!

The secret to this soup is caramelized leeks. To do this, spread your leeks out over the bottom of your heated stockpot and let them hang out for a bit. They’ll start to brown and take on a deep,  savoury flavour. Just remember to give them a swirl now and then, so they don’t burn.

This soup is fantastic hot or cold, so it’s currently my number one lunch recommendation! Grab your favourite mason jar and brace your taste buds, friend. This soup will rock your socks!

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Keep It FODMAP Friendly

Looking for a tasty lunch you can take to work? This low FODMAP Thai noodle soup is the lunch to beat! Check out the notes below for tips on keeping this recipe FODMAP friendly.

First up, chicken. Since chicken is a protein, it doesn’t have any FODMAPs. That means you can eat as much as you’d like without adding to your FODMAP load.

This soup gets its rich underlying flavour from garlic-infused oil. Don’t panic, though! FODMAPs are water soluble (meaning they break apart in water) but not fat soluble. That means when you cook a FODMAP in fats like butter or oil, the fat will absorb the oil, but not the FODMAPs.

When choosing a low FODMAP garlic-infused oil, check the label for ingredients like “garlic extract,” or “natural flavours,” as these may indicate there are actual garlic pieces in the oil. You should also check the bottle for visible pieces of garlic and sediment in the bottle. If you’re worried about dipping your toe into infused oils, try this garlic-infused oil by Fody Foods Co. This product is certified by Monash University, so it’s 100% low FODMAP.

We’ll also be using red peppers. According to the Monash app, red peppers don’t contain any FODMAPs. So you can eat as much as you’d like without adding to your FODMAP load.

Heads up! Peppers do contain a chemical called capsaicin. This chemical causes heartburn in some people. If you know you react to peppers, you can leave it out.

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This recipe also uses Thai red curry paste. If you don’t have a curry paste recipe handy, you can grab mine here. Because we’re only using 3 tbsp of curry paste for 8 servings, this won’t add a noticeable serving of FODMAPs to our recipe.

We’ll also be using coconut milk. According to Monash, coconut milk is low FODMAP in servings of 1/4 cup (60 g) per serving. Servings of 1/2 a cup (120 g) or more are high in the FODMAP sorbitol. We’ll be using 1 400 ml can of coconut milk which works out to 50 g per serving. This is within Monash’s recommended range.

We’ll also be using fresh basil. Monash University has said fresh basil is low FODMAP in servings of 1 cup per sitting though they don’t mention a limit.

The same goes for rice noodles. According to the Monash app, rice noodles are low FODMAP in servings of 1 cup per sitting. But Monash hasn’t listed a maximum serving size. According to Monash, this means these foods are safe to eat in large servings. You can read more about low FODMAP foods without limits here.

This recipe also uses fish sauce. Monash has listed fish sauce as low FODMAP in servings of 1 tbsp (44 g) per sitting. Servings of 1/2 a cup or more are high in both mannitol and GOS. Our recipe uses 1 tbsp of fish sauce for 8 servings. This works out to 5.5 g per serving which is well within Monash’s suggested range.

Last but not least, lime juice. According to the Monash app, lime juice is low FODMAP in servings of 1 cup (250 g) per serving. Servings of 1.5 cups (300 g) or more are high in the FODMAP fructan. Our recipe uses 2 tbsp of lime juice total. This works out to 7.81 g per serving, which is well within the recommended range.

Show Your Work (FODMAP Math)

This recipe has a ton of ingredients! Worried they’ll stack up on you? Take a deep breath, friend! While low FODMAP ingredients can add up, they only cause problems if they’re from the same FODMAP group. This is a phenomenon called FODMAP stacking (you can read more about it here).

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For the record, here are the FODMAPs found in each serving of this low FODMAP Thai noodle soup:

Fructose = 0 servings
Lactose = 0 servings
Fructans = 0.03 servings
GOS = 0.13 servings
Polyols = 1.46 servings

Want to try this low FODMAP Thai noodle soup? Don’t forget to PIN THIS RECIPE for later!

Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
45 mins
Total Time
1 hr
 

Ready to be the envy of your lunch table? Packed with colour and fresh flavours, this low FODMAP Thai noodle soup will be the talk of the table!

Course: Dinner, Lunch
Cuisine: Thai
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 257 kcal
Author: The FODMAP Formula
What You Need
  • 1 tbsp garlic-infused oil
  • 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (cut into bite-sized pieces)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup leek, green part only (diced)
  • 1 red bell pepper (diced)
  • 3 tbsp red curry paste
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger (grated)
  • 6 cups low FODMAP chicken broth
  • 1 (400 ml) can coconut milk
  • 8 oz thin rice noodles
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tsp brown sugar
  • 3 green onions, green part only (sliced)
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil (chopped)
  • 2 tbsp lime juice
What You Do
  1. Heat oil in a large stockpot. Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper. Then, add chicken to stockpot. Cook for until brown (3-4 minutes), then set aside. 

  2. Add the leeks to the pot. Let them brown for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add your red pepper and cook for another 3-4 minutes. 

  3. Stir in curry paste and ginger and cook for one minute. Add the chicken broth to the pot and scrape any brown spots off the bottom of the pot. Then, add the coconut milk and chicken, and bring the pot to a boil. 

  4. Once the soup is boiling, reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes to reduce the soup. 

  5. Add rice noodles, fish sauce, and brown sugar. Cook for an additional 5 minutes. 

  6. Remove the pot from the burner and add the green onions, fresh basil, and lime juice. Serve warm or cold. 

 

Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup in Bowl - Pinterest 1

Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup in Bowl - Pinterest 2
<Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup in Bowl - 735 x 1102
<Low FODMAP Thai Noodle Soup in Bowl - 735 x 1102

This low FODMAP Thai noodle soup will take your lunch break to the next level! Did you like this recipe? Don’t forget to share it! Together we’ll get the Low FODMAP Diet down to a science!

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© 2019 Amy Agur – The FODMAP Formula

 


You might also like one of these:

Low FODMAP Roasted Red Pepper Soup Looking for a savoury lunch idea you can take on-the-go? Grab your favourite mason jar and try this easy low FODMAP roasted red pepper soup!

Low FOMDAP Leek and Potato Soup Looking for a savoury lunch idea? This rich and creamy leek and potato soup will warm up your insides!

Low FODMAP No Bean Chili Chili lovers rejoice! Whether you’re looking for some FODMAP-friendly comfort food or something epic to serve on game day, this no bean chili will keep your taste buds and your tummy happy!

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